Role reversal, Eurozone style

Just as the third world countries are now sending missionaries and priests to decadent Western Europe, economic migrants are heading towards Africa from Europe. Try this, courtesy of Allister Heath at City AM:

But the story that truly captures the imagination comes courtesy of New York University’s Development Research Institute. It highlights the influx of Portuguese immigrants to Angola – an economy that has been growing by over 10 per cent a year since peace broke out in 2002 – and Mozambique, in a dramatic reversal of roles between erstwhile colony and ex-imperial power. There was a time when poor Africans flocked to southern Europe to better their lives; the opposite is now happening. Five hundred years after Vasco de Gama first landed in Mozambique, impoverished Portuguese are turning up in droves, begging for work permits. Six years ago, Angola issued 156 visas to Portuguese migrants. In the most recent year for which data is available, that number had exploded to 23,787; 100,000 Portuguese have moved to Angola, four times more than the traffic in the opposite direction. Other studies have shown a brain drain of Portuguese to Brazil and of Spanish youngsters – especially skilled graduates – to Latin America.

Angola, as it was

Portuguese workers in Angola now send home more cash to their families than Portuguese workers based in London. For millions of young people, Europe appears in terminal decline, while parts of Africa have emerged as a new Eldorado. The Eurozealots thought the single currency would turn old Europe into a new superpower; instead, it has catastrophically impoverished tens of millions of ordinary folk. It is time for an apology.

Painful.

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2 thoughts on “Role reversal, Eurozone style

  1. I’ve just come from Angola and will be heading to Kenya in the next two weeks. Yes the tide is changing, people in Africa know it. The most positive thing about being in Angola is that no one seemed to want to live to go anywhere. I haven’t yet encountered such positive sense of African or national pride. Great post. And of course I am a very proud Angolan who will be going back!

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